Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Initial tasting from a new bottle of scotch

One observation I made when taking the initial drink from a freshly opened bottle is that, more often than not, the scotch does not taste quite as good as subsequent tasting.  The difference, though certainly noticeable, is hard to describe - perhaps a "sharp" taste to it, as well as a stronger alcohol presence.

Left to stand by itself, the flavors will tend to meld and improve after a while.  Air, I believe, is the reason for this change in taste.  When the seal of the bottle is broken, and the cork is removed, air enters though the mouth of the bottle and interact with the alcohol.  This renewed interaction between air and liquor, combined with the natural evaporation of the alcohol, serves to alter the flavor of the drink. 

As always, bottoms up my friend.

62 comments:

  1. What about putting it in a decanter for a while or does that work?

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  2. Hmmm. It's my brother's birthday today. He's into all sorts of different things, and I think a bottle of scotch might make a unique gift.

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  3. Hmm, it could be an oxidizing effect. Oxygen is extremely well at bonding with other atoms and chemicals. I'm sure there is a science paper on the effect somewhere!

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  4. Interesting, i never really knew about that. But then again I don't really know too much about scotch, or alcohol in general :<

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  5. I noticed that too. I'm not the biggest fan of scotch but it does taste a little better after airing for a second

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  6. I noticed that too. I'm not the biggest fan of scotch but it does taste a little better after airing for a second

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  7. I mostly drink 15$ scotch. Doesn't really make a difference ;)

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  8. So air is a bad thing I take it :)

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  9. Had never noticed myself .... will try it with my next bottle.

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  10. I'm learning so much about scotch..thanks!

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  11. never noticed that. def looking forward next time

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  12. This is something I'll try to take notice of next time I open a bottle.

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  13. Scotch has always been the one liquor I just haven't really tried. No one I know likes it and I don't drink alone all too often. But it's sounding more and more interesting with each post here.

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  14. probably depends on the type of scotch

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  15. I didn't know that, I'll do some testing next time I have a drink

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  16. aw yeah, we're all keeping it classy

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  17. How often do you open a new bottle? Once a week?

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  18. Interesting observation. I'll have to try and notice it the next time I've got a new bottle

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  19. I'll make sure not to be the first one to drink the scotch :D

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  20. I have only had Johnny Walker(Red and Black), but it was quite enjoyable. I am mostly a whiskey drinker.

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  21. BOTTOMS UP - BOTTOMS UP

    lets party

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  22. Who knew that whiskey needed to breathe just like wine.

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  23. So basically what you're saying is that it's best not to hit a good bottle of scotch like a frat boy the second you open it.

    That might be what messed me up in my first Scotch experience...

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  24. i drink 10dollar brandy :/

    no money :(

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  25. yes, the air makes it taste more intensive.
    therfore the wine drinkers slurps their wine for a better taste

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  26. Did not know that. I'll try to take notice next time I get a bottle.

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  27. Hey I found this too! I found that the taste of Whisker, along with a couple of other drinks, increases as the volume of the liqueur decreases.

    I don't know if this is the effects of the alcohol, or chemistry with the air though.

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  28. That's interesting. I hear about having to let certain drinks "breath". So, I suppose that's what they mean.

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  29. Good to know. Same as 'breathing' red wine I guess.
    How long is a 'while'? An hour? A day?

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  30. like whisky in the jar heh..

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  31. I love whiskey but I can't handle bourbon whiskey. Only really like Canadian Whiskey. VO Gold is my favorite.

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  32. Didn't know that about airing it. Not managed to acquire a taste for scotch yet, though coming from Scotland I really should.

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  33. isn't that true for all hard drinks?

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  34. cool tip - didn't know that!

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  35. following and $upporting

    therichesthappiest.blogspot.com

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  36. didn't know about that too, nice info

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  37. Nifty little infos. I noticed the taste difference too.

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  38. i could sure go for some scotch right about now

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  39. I guess it's sort of like how sodas taste really sharp and fizzy when you first open them, but get more and more flat over time.
    I know scotch isn't carbonated, but the change is similar.

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  40. Damn girl mo Williams killin the celtics

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  41. i never noticed this, interesting observation

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  42. I'll keep that in mind, although I suck at recognising alcoholic drink's tastes

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  43. bet its aweosme when i post this

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  44. i only drink wine and beer :P they dont have that problem :P

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  45. Yes, of course. This is often talked about with wine. Letting the bottle "breathe" makes it taste COMPLETELY different. Also I've found that with scotch, letting it breathe in a glass full with a couple cubes of ice for 5 min makes it much smoother. Thanks!

    I follow and support those who do likewise.
    toastburnt.blogspot.com

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